Photo 21 Aug 3 notes This Roscoea purpurea HWJK2174 is in bloom in one of my gardens. A perennial herbaceous  plant in the Zingiberaceae family,  it’s named for William Roscoe, founder of the Liverpool Botanic Garden.

This Roscoea purpurea HWJK2174 is in bloom in one of my gardens. A perennial herbaceous  plant in the Zingiberaceae family,  it’s named for William Roscoe, founder of the Liverpool Botanic Garden.

Photo 8 Aug 1 note When you’re in the trenches of construction, it’s hard to enjoy the sunrise. But this morning, I came up for a breath of fresh air and just enough time to enjoy the view.

When you’re in the trenches of construction, it’s hard to enjoy the sunrise. But this morning, I came up for a breath of fresh air and just enough time to enjoy the view.

Photo 5 Aug I run my companies by the same schedule; the only difference is that I don’t have a sign explaining it.

I run my companies by the same schedule; the only difference is that I don’t have a sign explaining it.

Photo 2 Aug This is the east end of my mixed border garden. 
The photo was taken late afternoon just before sunset. 
 I successfully mix annual flowers, shrubs,  perennials and vegetables, (Eggplant and tomatoes are in the foreground). 
The large sweeps of color from the annuals, provide a visual anchor to the organized chaos of mixing so many plant types.  I tend to appreciate more the ornamental value of vegetables, when I count on them for visual impact in my mixed border.  What is nice is that the ornamental strengths that a vegetable displays there,  follows through to good food presentation on the plate.

This is the east end of my mixed border garden. 

The photo was taken late afternoon just before sunset. 

 I successfully mix annual flowers, shrubs,  perennials and vegetables, (Eggplant and tomatoes are in the foreground). 

The large sweeps of color from the annuals, provide a visual anchor to the organized chaos of mixing so many plant types.  I tend to appreciate more the ornamental value of vegetables, when I count on them for visual impact in my mixed border.  What is nice is that the ornamental strengths that a vegetable displays there,  follows through to good food presentation on the plate.

Photo 31 Jul 2 notes My summer in New York…
As many of you know, Re|Structure Design-Build is one of my companies. 
Our “boutique” construction firm’s fine reputation drew the attention of a very special client, who works in a very cool and interesting industry. 
I invite you to visit the Re|Structue Design-Build page on FaceBook and discover more. 
Our social media director is presenting a multi part series focused on this interesting project of ours, and the people and trades that are bringing it to life this summer in New York.

restructuredesignbuild:

Amongst the list of on-going Re|Structure projects, there is one in particular that is both unique and challenging in numerous ways.  The work is known as “The Room @ 110 Leroy”; the technologically advanced and esthetically rich, new post production and theatre studios for film producer / director Benjamin Murray.  
This venture is a collaboration of Re|Structure Design-Build, Technicolor Studios / Post Works, New York, and architect Rafi Segal.

The ingredients creating this iconic space are the rare blend of advanced film, audio, and acoustical technologies blended into clean, sophisticated architectural design with finely appointed finishes.  All executed at the most demanding levels of superior building craftsmanship.
The studios are of world class stature.
Currently, the industry standard for studios of this kind seems to be un-refined, poorly produced back-room operations.  Quite possibly the result of being complacent or “too comfortable” in how you have always done things in the past.
 The visionary minds of Murray, Pyontek and Segal along with their highly select teams of technicians and craftsmen are revolutionizing the old machine and creating a new industry standard at “The Room @ 110 Leroy”.    
In the next few weeks, we would like to present to you some of the stories involving this creative and stimulating space. Stories of the people, the construction and the spirit, a celebration of the skills and talents that goes into a work made special, a craft made unique.  

My summer in New York…

As many of you know, Re|Structure Design-Build is one of my companies. 

Our “boutique” construction firm’s fine reputation drew the attention of a very special client, who works in a very cool and interesting industry. 

I invite you to visit the Re|Structue Design-Build page on FaceBook and discover more. 

Our social media director is presenting a multi part series focused on this interesting project of ours, and the people and trades that are bringing it to life this summer in New York.

restructuredesignbuild:

Amongst the list of on-going Re|Structure projects, there is one in particular that is both unique and challenging in numerous ways.  The work is known as “The Room @ 110 Leroy”; the technologically advanced and esthetically rich, new post production and theatre studios for film producer / director Benjamin Murray.  

This venture is a collaboration of Re|Structure Design-Build, Technicolor Studios / Post Works, New York, and architect Rafi Segal.

The ingredients creating this iconic space are the rare blend of advanced film, audio, and acoustical technologies blended into clean, sophisticated architectural design with finely appointed finishes.  All executed at the most demanding levels of superior building craftsmanship.

The studios are of world class stature.

Currently, the industry standard for studios of this kind seems to be un-refined, poorly produced back-room operations.  Quite possibly the result of being complacent or “too comfortable” in how you have always done things in the past.

 The visionary minds of Murray, Pyontek and Segal along with their highly select teams of technicians and craftsmen are revolutionizing the old machine and creating a new industry standard at “The Room @ 110 Leroy”.    

In the next few weeks, we would like to present to you some of the stories involving this creative and stimulating space. Stories of the people, the construction and the spirit, a celebration of the skills and talents that goes into a work made special, a craft made unique.  

Photo 27 Jul 1 note Cornus kousa cv. “Wolf Eyes” is a relatively new cultivar of Kousa Dogwood.
In the fall of 2011, while visiting one of my favorite nurseries, Ambleside Nursery, in Hillsborough, NJ, I spotted this beautiful 6 foot tall specimen.  The tree simply glows and it easily stood out from the surrounding nursery stock and captured my attention.
I have a semi-shaded location in my yard that needed a plant which “visually popped”.  This tree would be perfect since the “Wolf Eyes” cultivar shows itself best in low light conditions, and the filtered sunlight protects the creamy white margined leaves from sun scorch. 
As with other C. kousa, this variety is a late spring bloomer with the typical four-petal white flowers.  With all the variegation going on, you barely notice the flowers.  A bonus show comes in late summer with the appearance of the red fruits.  They make a beautiful contrast to the leaves. (By the way…the fruits are edible and quite tasty.) 
In the fall, the leaves turn blush with pink and red hues.
One curious item with my tree is that my leaves exhibit a distinctive green “flecking” and fine green spotting in the white margins. (see insert)   In every description I have read on the variety, these characteristics are noticeably absent in every leaf description.  I would be interested in hearing from others growing this cultivar, if their leaves show the same patterns. 

Cornus kousa cv. “Wolf Eyes” is a relatively new cultivar of Kousa Dogwood.

In the fall of 2011, while visiting one of my favorite nurseries, Ambleside Nursery, in Hillsborough, NJ, I spotted this beautiful 6 foot tall specimen.  The tree simply glows and it easily stood out from the surrounding nursery stock and captured my attention.

I have a semi-shaded location in my yard that needed a plant which “visually popped”.  This tree would be perfect since the “Wolf Eyes” cultivar shows itself best in low light conditions, and the filtered sunlight protects the creamy white margined leaves from sun scorch. 

As with other C. kousa, this variety is a late spring bloomer with the typical four-petal white flowers.  With all the variegation going on, you barely notice the flowers.  A bonus show comes in late summer with the appearance of the red fruits.  They make a beautiful contrast to the leaves. (By the way…the fruits are edible and quite tasty.) 

In the fall, the leaves turn blush with pink and red hues.

One curious item with my tree is that my leaves exhibit a distinctive green “flecking” and fine green spotting in the white margins. (see insert)   In every description I have read on the variety, these characteristics are noticeably absent in every leaf description.  I would be interested in hearing from others growing this cultivar, if their leaves show the same patterns. 

Photo 26 Jul 24,987 notes I love the modern colors of the house combined with the green roof! 
leastofthese:

Foliage covered green roof in Kirkjubøur, a photo from Faroe Islands. More

I love the modern colors of the house combined with the green roof! 

leastofthese:

Foliage covered green roof in Kirkjubøur, a photo from Faroe Islands. More

Video 25 Jul 1,995 notes

This is such a neat design for a drone whose purpose is to collect refuse from the ocean! I hope they come up with one that will help clean away all the problems from things like the BP oil spill, and filter out things like plankton which would be undetected by infra red sensors. I really hope this drone goes from concept design to reality because our beautiful oceans deserve better than to be littered with our garbage.

a-skynet-future:

Marine Drone Concept Collects Plastic Waste To Clean The Ocean

Finally a robot doing something useful and not just singing and dancing…not that those things aren’t fun to watch!

From tuvie.com:

Plastic bag is a very useful item for consumers due to its durability and stability, however plastic also raises a problem in marine environments. If you take a walk along any beach anywhere in the world, you’ll notice there are many drifting plastic trash washed ashore. The growth of plastic waste in the ocean is already at alarming rate, this Marine Drone concept has been especially designed to provide an innovative way to collect plastic waste and clean the oceans.

Together with other drones this vehicle will catch plastic or any other waste using its special sensor to improve its ability to collect plastic waste. In order to keep fish away and accidentally trapped in the net, this Marine Drone is equipped with an infrasound system. The high powered batteries allow this drone to stay in the water for more than 2 weeks. These industrial designers have done extensive research in naval technology to come up with credible concept marine drone.

Photo 24 Jul 1 note teracottage:

“The original sled was purchased by my friend, Dr. Jennifer Erskine when we were Yard Sale Shopping in 2011. She spotted this vintage antique children’s sled, which I believe to be from around the late 1940s to early 1960s. These types of sleds were mass-produced for places like Sears, Woolworths, Macy’s and other similar stores. The wood in the original sled was mid-grade Red Oak with pine boards for the sled body. Maple was used for the skis and curved back band board. When Jen had purchased the sled, it was obvious that some repairs were needed, and Jen asked me if I would take it home and do the honors. 
Sometime later, I received an invitation: Jennifer’s son was having his first birthday party! Not having children of my own, I always enjoyed my time with Jen’s son, Thomas. Holding a baby brought wonderful new emotions to my surface and revealed a new side of me that I’d never known existed. I needed gift for him, and a fully restored sled; a legacy piece crafted with heart and hand, seemed like the perfect gift.
The restoration began by disassembling the entire sled and creating full size templates of each piece. The lower grade wood used in the original mass production was replaced with premium woods. The maple sled skis and curved back band were in excellent condition so I kept them, stripped them of their original varnish, and painted them a charcoal black. The sled body pieces were re-made in Maple. Red Oak was used for the side rails and back-band posts. Finally, I added Thomas’ name and date of birth in faux gold leaf lettering styled to match the vintage feel of the sled. 
When you find the perfect gift for someone, the giver received as much or quite possibly even more joy from the token than the receiver. That was how I felt as I worked on this extremely rewarding piece. I am not sure what fueled my work more: the crafting and restoration of an heirloom piece or knowing that what I delivered to Thomas may someday be given to his own child on their first birthday.”
-Keith Pyontek, owner of Teracottage

teracottage:

“The original sled was purchased by my friend, Dr. Jennifer Erskine when we were Yard Sale Shopping in 2011. She spotted this vintage antique children’s sled, which I believe to be from around the late 1940s to early 1960s. These types of sleds were mass-produced for places like Sears, Woolworths, Macy’s and other similar stores. The wood in the original sled was mid-grade Red Oak with pine boards for the sled body. Maple was used for the skis and curved back band board. When Jen had purchased the sled, it was obvious that some repairs were needed, and Jen asked me if I would take it home and do the honors. 

Sometime later, I received an invitation: Jennifer’s son was having his first birthday party! Not having children of my own, I always enjoyed my time with Jen’s son, Thomas. Holding a baby brought wonderful new emotions to my surface and revealed a new side of me that I’d never known existed. I needed gift for him, and a fully restored sled; a legacy piece crafted with heart and hand, seemed like the perfect gift.

The restoration began by disassembling the entire sled and creating full size templates of each piece. The lower grade wood used in the original mass production was replaced with premium woods. The maple sled skis and curved back band were in excellent condition so I kept them, stripped them of their original varnish, and painted them a charcoal black. The sled body pieces were re-made in Maple. Red Oak was used for the side rails and back-band posts. Finally, I added Thomas’ name and date of birth in faux gold leaf lettering styled to match the vintage feel of the sled. 

When you find the perfect gift for someone, the giver received as much or quite possibly even more joy from the token than the receiver. That was how I felt as I worked on this extremely rewarding piece. I am not sure what fueled my work more: the crafting and restoration of an heirloom piece or knowing that what I delivered to Thomas may someday be given to his own child on their first birthday.”

-Keith Pyontek, owner of Teracottage

Quote 23 Jul
"Human beings by their very nature are worshipers. Worship is not something we do, it defines who we are. You cannot divide human beings into those who worship and those who don’t. Everybody worships, it’s just a matter of what, or whom we serve".
— Paul David Tripp
Photo 16 Jul 
Here is a photo from my garden.  7/14/12 I had my first harvest of Carrot daucus carota  ”Atomic Red”.  The seeds for this crop were sown on 4/15/12.
The average root was about 5” in length.  They could have grown larger but I would rather harvest carrots on the younger side for best flavor.

Pulled these in the morning and had them for supper.  Simply sauteed in butter.  Very good, tender, and a distinct, fresh carrot taste.  One comment at dinner was that they had a bit of an “orange zest” taste to them.  Flavors burst all over the place with fresh garden to table!  I have about two more pickings still growing. 
 
I grew a lot of “red” color veggies this year.  I did so because red veggies have a higher Lycopine content. 
I was a bit disappointed in the degree of red with this crop of “Atomic Red” at  picking however, they did turn a more burnt-orange red in cooking.
 
The source of my seeds in this crop was Victory Seeds.  I purchased seeds from this company for the first time this year and I am very pleased with the germination rate, quality and service. 
 
"Deep Thinker"…an important point to remember when growing carrots is that you cannot forget that you are growing a root.  The soil must be loose and amended with compost to a depth of 12 to 15 inches.  Give the roots nurishment and a easy path to grow down. 
Here is a photo from my garden.  7/14/12 I had my first harvest of Carrot daucus carota  ”Atomic Red”.  The seeds for this crop were sown on 4/15/12.
The average root was about 5” in length.  They could have grown larger but I would rather harvest carrots on the younger side for best flavor.

Pulled these in the morning and had them for supper.  Simply sauteed in butter.  Very good, tender, and a distinct, fresh carrot taste.  One comment at dinner was that they had a bit of an “orange zest” taste to them.  Flavors burst all over the place with fresh garden to table!  I have about two more pickings still growing. 
 
I grew a lot of “red” color veggies this year.  I did so because red veggies have a higher Lycopine content. 
I was a bit disappointed in the degree of red with this crop of “Atomic Red” at  picking however, they did turn a more burnt-orange red in cooking.
 
The source of my seeds in this crop was Victory Seeds.  I purchased seeds from this company for the first time this year and I am very pleased with the germination rate, quality and service. 
 
"Deep Thinker"…an important point to remember when growing carrots is that you cannot forget that you are growing a root.  The soil must be loose and amended with compost to a depth of 12 to 15 inches.  Give the roots nurishment and a easy path to grow down. 
Video 13 Jul 624 notes

Nature has always been visually stunning, but these photographs really capture some specific and outstanding details!

staceythinx:

The Big Picture Extrordinary Microscope Photography gallery features the winners of The Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition, which are currently on display at the New York Hall of Science through August 31. Check it out for more fascinating images like these.

Video 11 Jul 2 notes

restructurellc:

Most people would look at an insect-eaten piece of wood as refuse, but Yaron Hirsch’s Animal Vegetable Mineral glamorizes these alterations as beautiful natural changes to be celebrated in the pieces they make.

Video 9 Jul 1 note

Where art, technology and innovative concepts meet only amazing things can happen.

Video 2 Jul 75 notes

so-aware:

FARM:shop

by Something & Son

FARM:shop was developed by Something & Son LLP, an eco-social design practice, with three ambitious goals – 1) To excite and inspire city dwellers to grow their own food, fabric and medicine and make an income doing this, 2) To create direct links between farms in the countryside with communities in cities, and 3) To grow food commercially via a network of FARM:’s across cities and retail this food at FARM:shop’s. 

In July 2010 they began the transformation of a four story dilapidated shop into an urban farm and advocacy center, located in East London. Since launching in Spring 2011 they are now operating as a sustainable business growing fish, chickens and lots of salad, and running a cafe, workspace and events venue. Their process combines art, engineering and business know-how to find creative ways to improve the world around us.

Be sure to check out the behind the scenes video here.

Spotted via: TNYPXL

via So|Aware.

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